Appendix 2 - Protected Structures in Kilmallock Local Area Plan, and general guidance for undertaking works on older buildings

closeddate_range13 Apr, 2019, 8:00am - 27 May, 2019, 5:00pm

A Protected Structure is a structure that is considered to be of special interest from an architectural, historical, archaeological, artistic, cultural, scientific, social or technical point of view. 

The Record of Protected Structures (RPS) is a list of the buildings held by a Local Authority that contains buildings considered to be of special interest in its operational area. 

Section 51 (of the 2000 Act) requires that the development plan shall include a Record of Protected Structures and that the Record shall include every structure that is, in the opinion of the Planning Authority, of special interest.   Refer to limerick.ie and Section 6.4 of this plan.

 

(i) Record of Protected Structures

 

Ref:

Building/

Structure

Location/

Townland

Description/

Comments and category of interest

Picture

1350

Town Wall

Kilmallock

Medieval town defences refer to Kilmallock Town Wall Conservation and Management Plan

Courtesy of Sarah McCutcheo

1351

Scoil Iosef – post primary school

Abbeyfarm

Designed by the Cork born architect, Dominic Mary O'Connor, constructed 1931

NIAH ref: 2181307

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1352

Abbeyview

Abbeyfarm

Parochial House built 1870

NAIH 21813016

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1353

St Peter & Paul’s RC Church

Kilmallock

Gothic Revival Roman Catholic church, built between 1878-79, designed by architect  J.J. McCarthy

NIAH  21813015

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1355

24 Sheares Street

 Kilmallock

End of terrace, two-bay, two storey house built c.1830

 

NIAH 21813018 

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1356

Avida Hairdressers

Sheare Street

Kilmallock

Two storey house built c.1830, later ground floor retail use.

 

NIAH 21813013

 

©copyright NIAH

1357

Dominican Abbey

Abbeyfarm

National Monument

LI047-022018

 

 

Extracted from Kilmallock Town Wall 

Conservation and Management Plan

1358

Sheare Street

Kilmallock

Terraced, two-bay, two storey house built c.1830

 

NIAH 21813012

Architectural value, retaining 

most of its original fabric 

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1359

Sheare Street

Kilmallock

Two-bay, two storey, terraced house built c.1830

 

1360

Kilmallock Museum

Chapel Lane

Detached, three-bay, two storey, house built c.1830

 

 

1361

Sheare Street

Kilmallock

Terraced, three-bay, two-storey house built c.1830

 

NIAH 21813011

 

©copyright NIAH

1362

Kings Castle

Sheare Street/

Sarsfield Street 

National Monument LI047-022008

 

1363

Merchant’s House

Sarsfield Street

National Monument LI047-022019

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1364

Collegiate Church

Orr Street

National Monument LI047-022009

 

1365

Sarsfield  Street

Kilmallock

Attached two-bay,  two-storey house built c.1810

NIAH 21813006

 

1366

Sarsfield  Street

Kilmallock

Attached two-bay,  two-storey house built c.1810

NIAH 21813005

 

1367

M.J.Feore

Sarsfield  Street

Kilmallock

Terraced  two-storey house built c.1820 - 40

NIAH 21813023

 

©copyright NIAH

1368

Friar’s Gate Theatre

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Former cinema, art noveau style

©copyright NIAH

1369

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Remains of 17th century

Sarsfield

House 

seen in the

masonry walls

on either sides

of the

cinema/theatre

©copyright NIAH

1370

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Terraced  three-storey, two-bay house built c.1840

NIAH 21813024

 

©copyright NIAH

1371

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Terraced  two-storey, four-bay building built c.1830

NIAH 21813004

 

©copyright NIAH

1372

Abbey Launderette

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Terraced  three-storey, two-bay house built c.1810

NIAH 21813003

 

©copyright NIAH

1373

Bridge

Wolfe Tone Street

Kilmallock

Four-arch humpback road bridge over the River Loobagh with overflow arch, built c. 1800, original bridge circa.1290

NIAH 21813031

 

©copyright NIAH

1374

Wolfe Tone Street

Kilmallock

 

 

 

©copyright Google Maps

1375

Cottage

Wolfe Tone Street

 

1376

Cottage

Wolfe Tone Street

 

1377

Ivy Cottage

Wolfe Tone Street

Built 1709 – 1810

 

 

NIAH 21813030

 

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1378

Cottage

Wolfe Tone Street

NIAH 21813029

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1379

Church of Ireland 

Deebert

Romanesque Revival style Church of Ireland church, built in 1938.

 

 

NIAH 21813059

 

  

©copyright NIAH

1380

Coote Memorial Hall

Deebert

Built 1905

 

NIAH 21813058

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1381

Deebert House

Deebert

Built c.1804

 

NIAH 21813060

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1382

Creamery

Deebert

Social/historic value – part of historic mill complex

1383

Wolfe Tone Street

Kilmallock

 

1385

Wolfe Tone Street

Kilmallock

 

1387

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Built circa. 1820

 

NIAH 21813003

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1388

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813003

 

 

©copyright NIAH

1389

O’Sullivan

Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813027

 

©copyright NIAH

1390

Baalbec House 

Wolfe Tone Street/ Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813033

 

1391

Lynch’s Sarsfield Street

Kilmallock

Built circa. 1820

 

NIAH 21813003

 

©copyright NIAH

1392

Lee Solicitor

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

Kilmallock 

©copyright NIAH

1393

AIB

Lord Edward Street 

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813034

 

©copyright NIAH

1394

FDC 

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813037

 

©copyright NIAH

1395

O Cearbhaill

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813038

 

©copyright NIAH

1396

Cahills

Lord Edward Street

 

NIAH 21813047

 

1397

Cahills

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

Eastern frontage of the building

 

1398

Former Post Office

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813046

 

1399

Power

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813044, and 21813045

Built 1871-73

 

©copyright NIAH

1400

Fitzgerald’s Lounge/Bar

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

Note adjacent stone arch NIAH 21813043 – architectural and artistic value circa.1871

©copyright NIAH

1401

Blossom Gate

Emmet Street

Kilmallock

Part of town defences – archaeological, technical, historical value – National Monument status on Record of National Monument and Places

1402

Peoples Hall

Railway Road

Deebert

 

1403

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813043 –Stone arch circa.1871

©copyright NIAH

1405

Lord Edward Street

Kilmallock

NIAH 21813043

 

circa.1870

©copyright NIAH

1406

Millmount

Millmount

Gate pier associated with workhouse

1407

Kilmallock District Court House – former Union Workhouse

Millmount

NIAH 21813040

Gothic Revival style architectural and artistic value circa.1841

 

Recent refurbishment

1408

Remains of workhouse laundry

Railway Road

Millmount

 

1409

Former convent, former Parochial House

Railway Road

Railway Road

NIAH 21813039 circa.1870

 

©copyright NIAH

1410

Dwelling

Railway Road

Late Victorian and Edwardian style house

 

 

1411

Dwelling

Railway Road

Art and Craft style house

 

 

1412

Dwelling

Railway Road

Late Victorian and Edwardian style house

 

NIAH 21813057

1413

Dwelling – Clonan House

Railway Road

Victorian style house, built circa 1870

 

NIAH 21813053

1414

Railway Station

Gortboy

NIAH 21813039–circa.1840

 

1415

Charleville Road

Gortboy

Gortboy

NIAH 21813050

Built circa 1790 -1810

 

©copyright NIAH

1416

Charleville Road

Gortboy

Charleville Road

Gortboy

NIAH 21813048

Built circa 1790 -1810

 

©copyright NIAH

1417

Charleville Road

Gortboy

Charleville Road

Gortboy

NIAH 21813049

Built circa 1790 -1810

 

©copyright NIAH

 

General guidance for undertaking works on older buildings

To ensure that works undertaken on older traditional buildings, it is important that these works do not damage the special qualities of the building itself or the traditional streetscape.  Many of these buildings have been in existence for generations and the owners have a responsibility to pass on these buildings as part of Kilmallocks history and heritage.  When carrying out maintenance or repair works consider the following:

  • Avoid renovation works that compromises the visual appeal of the original façade and the ACA.  Do as little work to the building as is possible to maintain the historical integrity of the building
  • Use experts in the area of conservation and engage the services of accredited professionals such as the conservation architects accredited by the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland.  Similarly, the Society of Chartered Surveyors has a register of conservation surveyors.
  • Do your research, establish and understand reasons for the building or the feature of the building not being fit-for-purpose before undertaking the works.
  • Ensure that the appropriate materials and methods are used during the works and pay attention to detail. 
  • Record all repairs works for the benefit of future owners.
  • Avoid looking at problems in isolation, no matter how minor they seem.  Consider problems in the context of the building as whole and adjoining buildings on the streetscape.
  • Be careful when sourcing materials through architectural salvage.  Be sure that your materials are from reliable sources and have not been taken at the expense of other buildings through theft.

 

In undertaking repairs or maintenance works to buildings in the Kilmallock ACA, property owners and their contractors should be aware of the materials traditionally used in the county, and more specifically, in the town itself and its immediate surrounds.

 

Works in Conservation Areas must retain existing surviving elements, aim to re-instate lost elements or character, with new build complementing the original streetscapes, building lines and open areas.  Where original or early surviving elements, such as windows and doors, rainwater goods of rolled mild steel or cast iron (or a combination of both), natural slate roofing and lime renders, and so forth, then these should be repaired sensitively.  The guidance here is to “do as much as necessary, as little as possible”. If replacement proves necessary, then they must be replaced on a “like-for-like” basis.

 

In replacing elements that were installed as replacements in recent decades, such as aluminium windows or smooth finish artificial slate, there are good reasons, apart from those put forward on the basis of architectural heritage, to return to the original materials, such as timber windows and natural slate.  These reasons include the compatibility of traditional materials with one another and the fact that the historic material allows the building to breathe, thereby providing a healthier internal atmosphere for those using the buildings. 

 

It is critical that interventions made retain original or early surviving material and fabric.  These are limited resources that are virtually impossible to replace.  Quite often, new material (though acceptable) is of a distinctively different character and if it proves necessary to take this route, then it should be positioned in as discrete a location as possible, with the original material placed in the most visible spots.  

 

Historic building materials, and the techniques used to assemble them, meant that the structures erected are porous.  They have an ability to breathe, shedding accumulated moisture from within the building and from its fabric.  Any proposals to replace the renders should recognize this and ensure that new plasters, whether internal or external, are mixed used the correct proportions of sharp sands, aggregates and building lime.  Similar measures should be adopted when replacing failing pointing.   

 

The use of paints or other materials of modern composition, which seal the surfaces to which they are applied, should be avoided as they have a deleterious impact on lime based materials, whether used in renders or other finishes.  The use of garish colours on walls or details of structures (such as quoins), which clash with the traditional range of pigments must be avoided as they impact negatively on the cohesiveness of the streetscape.  If individuality is sought, it can be imparted to a building through highlighting the timberwork of doors and their frames, windows and gates - features which are recessed slightly and out of direct view of those looking along the length of the conservation area.  Joinery and ironmongery should also be painted with breathable finishes.  Micro-porous paints do not dry to a high-gloss but have a skin which allows any moisture that may penetrate through to the material below to evaporate, thereby preventing it from causing serious damage through decay or rusting.  

 

Internal works, such as insulation, should ensure that the materials selected are compatible with the historic materials from which the building is constructed.  Double-glazing as replacement for original windows is generally not acceptable.  However, other interventions, such as the reinstatement of roller blinds and the installation of secondary glazing with polycarbonate panels held in place with magnetic mounts, can achieve significant improvements at a significantly lower cost than the wholesale replacement of historic windows.

 

Other works, such as the improvements/replacement of electrical supply and distribution systems, mechanical services, heating systems, equipment such as air conditioning units, may have implications for the external appearance of buildings within the ACAs, and the plots on which they stand.  Compliance with other regulatory bodies, such as the Fire Department, may also raise issues.  Consequently, interventions which may impact existing fabric, places and spaces should be carefully planned.  Consultations should be undertaken at the earliest opportunity with the planning authority to ensure that the character and ambience of the ACA is not harmed.

 

For general advice on planning issues relating to architectural heritage refer to  Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2011) is available to download from the website of the Department of Culture, Heritage & the Gaeltacht.  These statutory guidelines set out the mechanisms for protecting architectural heritage, and the principles of conservation that should apply to any proposed alterations to the building. Appendix B (Architectural Heritage Impact Assessments) of that document sets out the type of information that the owner should prepare when lodging a planning application. By preparing such an assessment before finalising the plans, the owner and their professional advisors are in a better position to mitigate any negative effects and generally to consider how the development can best maintain and enhance the character of the structure.

The Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht also publishes a series of booklets, the Advice Series, for owners and custodians of historic buildings. The booklets offer detailed guidance on how best to repair, maintain and adapt such properties. Further information on an individual building may be available on the website of the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage: www.buildingsofireland.ie.